“Charm of Austria” Photo Workshop

I will once again be leading a photography workshop in Austria, this time focused on the “Charm of Austria” in Salzburg and the nearby Alps.

During the workshop we’ll explore small towns, rugged landscapes, mountain peaks, Alpine lakes, and more. You’ll capture great photographs and create cherished memories along the way. With a small group of just four photographers, you’ll get individual attention as we spend five full days exploring beautiful locations in Austria and Germany.

For all of the details about my “Charm of Austria” photo workshop, please visit my website here:

http://www.timgreyphoto.com/austria-2019

Webinar Recording: “Ten Favorite Photos (And What They Taught Me)”

We have published the recording of my recent presentation on “Ten Favorite Photos (And What They Taught Me)” on the Tim Grey TV channel on YouTube. This presentation was part of the GreyLearning Webinar Series, and focused on helping you improve your photography based on the lessons I’ve learned from some of my favorite photos.

You can view the full webinar presentation recording here:

https://youtu.be/rnDbibpPaik

 

Photo Contest: “Abstract”

The theme for the GreyLearning Photo Contest for September is “Abstract”, inviting photographers to submit their best photo where it is not immediately obvious to the viewer what the subject is. The Grand Prize for this contest is a Tamron 18-400mm lens valued at US$649, thanks to a sponsorship from Tamron USA. Please note that for this contest the winner must reside in the United States.

For all of the details and to submit a photo for this contest, please follow this link:

https://timgrey.me/abstract

 

The Real Cause of Noise

Today’s “Ask Tim Grey” email (which you can sign up to receive here: http://timgrey.me/greylists) resulted in a great deal of feedback from readers, so I thought I would publish the full question and answer here on the GreyLearning blog. The question related to the notion of the camera’s ISO setting not really being the cause of noise in digital photos. That notion is mostly true, but requires clarification. Here is my effort at providing that clarification:

Today’s Question: I just saw an article that said raising the ISO setting does not actually increase noise in a photo, but instead shorter exposure durations cause noise. This doesn’t match what I’ve always read. What are your thoughts?

Tim’s Quick Answer: It is mostly true that raising the ISO setting isn’t the true cause of noise in a digital camera. However, it is important to keep in mind that the article in question specifically related to astrophotography. For more terrestrial forms of photography, it is still generally safe to assume that a lower ISO setting will translate to reduced noise levels.

The lower ISO shot has more noise because amplifying the capture data in the camera provides better results than brightening in post-processing

More Detail: As I’ve said many times, noise is the opposite of information, and in the context of photography light is the information we’re dealing with. Thus, less light will translate into more noise. This is the foundation of the “expose to the right” principle, which calls for capturing photos that are as bright as possible without losing highlight detail in order to maximize detail and minimize noise.

However, this does not mean that you should use a high ISO setting to minimize noise. Quite the contrary for most photographic scenarios.

Raising the ISO setting will require that you either use a faster shutter speed or a smaller lens aperture opening in order to reduce the amount of light reaching the sensor. The amplification triggered by the increased ISO setting will then compensate for the exposure.

However, raising the ISO setting really translates into (potentially dramatically) underexposing the image, and then amplifying the capture information in the camera. The underexposure is indeed the key cause of noise, but that underexposure was caused by a higher ISO setting. So the two are related.

Furthermore, this issue is more nuanced than the article suggested, because there is a big difference between underexposing with versus without an increase in ISO. If you use the exact same shutter speed and aperture settings at a low versus high ISO setting, you will see more noise (and less detail) in the capture with the low ISO setting. This is an indication that the camera is able to do a better job of brightening the image (through amplification of the signal) than our computers are able to do by simply brightening pixel values.

But again, more light will help ensure the lowest noise levels. Thus, you generally want as much light to reach the sensor in the camera as possible. That, in turn, means keeping the ISO setting at the minimum setting, so that you will use a larger lens aperture and/or a longer exposure duration to compensate. That results in more light, and therefore less noise.

So for most photographic scenarios, it still holds true with most cameras that you want to use the lowest ISO setting.

The reason a different approach to ISO makes sense with astrophotography is that you generally don’t have any flexibility when it comes to shutter speed and lens aperture. You may be shooting with the lens aperture wide open, and the shutter speed at the longest exposure duration possible without introducing star trails. If you need more signal, your only option is to increase the ISO setting. As noted above, a higher ISO setting is generally preferable to a low setting when all other factors (shutter speed and lens aperture) are fixed.

 

Webinar: Adding Impact to Your Photos

During today’s presentation as part of the GreyLearning Webinar Series, I shared tips for “Adding Impact to Your Photos”. This included tips on composition, photographic technique, subject selection, and more.

You can view a recording of the full webinar presentation here:

https://youtu.be/UU4w6yW7_Xk

The GreyLearning Webinar Series is sponsored by Tamron USA. Be sure to check out the “One Location, One Lesson, One Lens” video series on Tamron’s YouTube channel here:

https://youtube.com/TamronVids

Contest Winner: “Dazzling Night”

Photographer Nick Noble has been selected as the winner of the July 2018 GreyLearning Photo Contest with his image of the Frisco Pier in North Carolina. The theme for this photo contest was “Dazzling Night”, inviting photographers to submit their best image captured at night.

Frisco Pier by Nick Noble

Nick had this to say about capturing this photo:

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Frisco Pier is (was) in North Carolina in the part of the coast known as the Outer Banks. It was in the town of Frisco, just a few miles from the more famous Cape Hatteras lighthouse. Frisco Pier was for fishing. It was heavily damaged during Hurricane Irene in 2003 and then again by Hurricane Earl in 2010. It closed 2010 and was abandoned until fall 2017 when it was taken down. With no lights, it was a hazard to navigation near the shore.

My photo was taken in March 2017 on a dark no moon night about 5am (sunrise at 7:15 am, so 5 is about 45 minutes before Astronomical Twilight). Camera information: Canon 5D Mark IV, Sigma 20mm f/1.4 lens at f/2, ISO 6400, 30 seconds.

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As the winning photographer Nick will receive one year of full access to the GreyLearning Ultimate Bundle.

Congratulations to Nick on a beautiful winning image! You can view more of his photography on his Facebook page here:

https://www.facebook.com/NickNoblePhotography/

You can also find Nick on Instagram here:

https://www.instagram.com/nsqr/

“Heart of Rome” Photo Workshop

I am happy to announce I will once again be leading a photography workshop in the heart of Rome, Italy, in 2019.

This workshop is all-inclusive and features five full days photographing in Rome. We’ll visit some of the most popular sights, and also explore many hidden corners of this incredible city. And with only six workshop participants, you’ll be able to get individual help with your photography and composition.

For more information about this workshop, you can visit the Tim Grey Photo website here:

http://www.timgreyphoto.com/rome-2019

Webinar: “Mistakes to Avoid in Lightroom”

During today’s presentation as part of the GreyLearning Webinar Series, I shared my top recommendations for “Mistakes to Avoid in Lightroom”. The focus of this presentation was on helping photographers keep their Lightroom catalog and their overall workflow streamlined and efficient. I talked about the most common mistakes I see photographers making in Lightroom, and shared tips for avoiding (or correcting) those mistakes.

You can view a recording of the full webinar presentation here:

https://youtu.be/kQ05nMd9G98

The GreyLearning Webinar Series is sponsored by Tamron USA. Be sure to check out the “One Location, One Lesson, One Lens” video series on Tamron’s YouTube channel here:

https://youtube.com/TamronVids

Contest Winner: “Magnificent Monochrome”

Photographer John Gafford has been selected as the winner of the June 2018 GreyLearning Photo Contest with his image, “Channeling Leonardo”. The theme for this photo contest was “Magnificent Monochrome”, inviting photographers to submit their best black and white (or otherwise monochrome) photo.

Channeling Leonardo by John Gafford

John had this to say about capturing this photo:

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While on a recent trip to the Provence region of France, I was walking around the Arles Saturday market, when I spotted a distinguished looking elderly man dressed in black wandering through the market. I followed him for a while, hoping to snap a candid picture of him. After a few minutes, he happened to gaze up toward a nearby building and at that moment, I snapped this image. With his white beard and black shirt and jacket, I thought it would make a great black and white image. I shot the image at 1/250 second, f/8, ISO 200 at 210 mm with a Nikon D800.

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As the winning photographer John will receive a copy of Exposure X3 software for optimizing and organizing photos, thanks to a generous sponsorship from Alien Skin Software.

Congratulations to John on a beautiful winning image! You can view more of his photography on his website here:

http://www.johngaffordphotography.com/

You can also find John on Instagram here:

https://www.instagram.com/johngaffordphotography/

 

One Year of “Lightroom Quick Tips”!

The publication of today’s episode of “Lightroom Quick Tips” marks one full year of weekly tips! Every week for the past year there has been a new “quick tip” focused on Lightroom Classic CC added to the “Lightroom Quick Tips” course in the GreyLearning library. And new episodes are still being added every week.

The tip published on the one year anniversary of this course addressed the new feature for adding color labels to folders in Lightroom. You can view that tip on the Tim Grey TV channel on YouTube here:

https://youtu.be/FE6q1MASRh

Don’t forget to subscribe (for free) to the Tim Grey TV channel on YouTube, and if you’d like more quick tips on Lightroom you can learn more about the “Lightroom Quick Tips” course on the GreyLearning website here:

https://www.greylearning.com/courses/lightroom-tips